Rule-breaker

Rules? What Rules? How to Embrace Your Inner Rule-Breaker

Chrisy Woll, VP of Customer SuccessBy Chrisy Woll, VP, Customer Success

I believe in rules. Sure I do. If there weren’t any rules, how could you break them?

—Leo Durocher, Major League Baseball Hall of Famer

I know many of you are like me: Give me a rule and I’ll quickly figure out a way to break it. Just ask my mom what my teenage years were like—and she’ll give you endless stories about all the rules I refused to follow!

I love a rule-breaker—not for the sake of just breaking rules, but for pushing the limits on things that don’t make sense and figuring out alternatives. This rule-breaker mentality is still deep within me and I love that I get the opportunity to work with so many others who feel the same.

When a school takes the leap to transform the student financial services journey by implementing CampusLogic, it’s breaking the rules around how things have “always been done.” This is inspiring to me! And it got me thinking about some rules I like to break often.

3 Rules That Are Meant to be Broken

  1. Don’t point out your mistakes. People see that as a weakness!

Do you think people won’t see mistakes if you don’t admit to them? The truth is, the more open you can be about mistakes, the more people will trust you. It is hard to trust somebody who thinks they’re perfect and that they make no mistakes—or worse, tries to blame others.

Self-awareness is a good thing. And that includes admitting when we mess up.

  1. Don’t brag about your accomplishments.

Why not? You worked hard to get there and should be proud to share milestones with others. Being humble when sharing accomplishments is key to being relatable, rather than just seeming full of ego when talking about what you accomplished.

Also, most of us don’t make it to where we are alone. When you brag on your accomplishments, it gives you an opportunity to brag on those around you who helped you get there.

  1. “I told you ‘NO’ the first time.”

Well, you may have to tell me ‘no’ a few more times. ‘No’ means I need to go back to the drawing board and figure out a different plan. How many awesome innovators and leaders have been told no the first time? Bill Gates, Walt Disney, Oprah Winfrey, Michael Jordan, Steven Spielberg, Jay-Z? I can keep going, but I think you get the point.

If you give up every time you hear a ‘no,’ you won’t achieve success.

Break the Rules for a Better Student Experience

I love a good rule-breaker story. I get the opportunity to hear them every day because we work with schools that are trying to innovate and provide the best possible experience for their students and staff. Sometimes, that involves breaking a few rules.

Read More from Customer Success Guru Chrisy Woll >